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Textile Art with Pamela Priday

Pamela Priday is a quiltmaker, designer and textile artist using commercial and hand-dyed fabrics, yarns, threads, and various textile media. her passion is to create unique original designs for others to enjoy. She uses texture and colour to communicate ideas about landscape other experiences, the tactility of fabric and luscious vibrant colours result in stunning impressions.

For three years Pamela has served as Vice President of the Quilters Guild of NSW Inc which she has found fulfilling with the connection to like-minded creative souls. She also has ongoing membership with this Guild and ATASDA (Australian Textile Arts and Surface Design Association Inc). Regular group meetings in Sydney where Pamela lives, are a wonderful way to enjoy creative minds and stimulate new styles of work.

Her work includes Baby Quilts, Art wall hangings in various sizes , Textile Landscapes, and Textile Jewellery. As a creator and designer Pamela is constantly looking for new skills to expand her repertoire of effects.

Pamela has her own site called Crafty Quilting where much of her work can be seen and invites discussion on her blog. The image below is her latest foray into textiles based upon the Flinders Ranges in South Australia. This link will take you to her website to see further examples of landscape work http://craftyquilting.wordpress.com

Now semi-retired, Pamela Priday has the time to enjoy her passion and has generously agreed to share some of her processes with the Chroma community. Have a look below for 3 different projects to whet your appetite for textile art.

There are (3) Comments, Comments are now closed for this discussion?
  1. comment_1_11564

    Jim Cobb commented on September 30, 2010, at 5:26 pm.

    Chinese Lanterns Art-Quilt For The Wall
    By Pamela Priday

    A Monoprinted image using three different printing techniques:

    - Printing plate

    - Bubble wrap

    - Rubber mat


    Materials
    - A sturdy piece of glass plate, perspex or a glass chopping board for use as a printing plate. Tape any sharp edges to prevent injury.
    - Printing mat (plastic covered lightly padded base).
    - Selection of Jo Sonja’s Artists’ Colours
    - Jo Sonja’s Textile Medium
    - Sponge brush
    - Bubble wrap – the size of your fabric
    - Rubber mat – a little shorter than your fabric
    - Water spray bottle
    - Fabrics and wadding
    - Sewing materials

    Method
    Enjoy the freedom of starting out your project with no predetermined image in mind.
    Exercise your creativity – monoprint with Jo Sonja’s paints and let your fabric-art “talk to you” in a way that utilises the image that arises in your mind. For example, Chinese lanterns emerged in my thoughts as I viewed the completed painted piece and then my stitch and embellishments supported this image.

    1. Fabrics needed for this project are a commercial fabric for the background (top of quilt), backing and binding. Background fabric tone should not be too dark to allow the painted images to clearly show.

    2. Wadding for the middle of the quilt is also needed – I like to use cotton wadding but any of your choice could be used. Note, the wadding does not need to be washed.

    3. Remove fabric sizing by washing the background piece prior to printing.

    4. Adopt the usual practice of using a lightly padded plastic base when applying the prints to your fabric pieces.

    5. For the first monoprint: Apply solid circles of paints (about 1½ inches round) mixed with Textile medium (50/50) onto the printing plate. (I used red, purple, yellow to also create orange).

    6. Lay background fabric over printing plate. Roll with a brayer (or use your hand) to make a firm imprint onto the fabric. Carefully lift fabric off plate and lay over plastic base. At this stage you may wish to lightly spray the fabric with water if you want your paint to spread a little with a slightly watery look. Let this dry.

    7. For the second monoprint: Place bubble wrap on plastic printing base. Using a sponge brush paint bubble wrap with a 50/50 mixture of paint and Textile Medium. Colours mixed were black and blue to make a dark bluish-black print to show over the previous printed colours.

    8. Lay fabric over the painted bubble wrap and press using a brayer or your hands to engage a print. Do this lightly on some areas and using stronger pressure on other areas – to give interesting light to dark images. Lift off and let the fabric dry.

    9. For the third monoprint: Using the same paint/textile medium mixture and technique as in the 2nd monoprint, paint your rubber mat. Using this like a stamp, place it over the fabric and press with a brayer or your hands to imprint. Let this dry.

    10. Iron the dried painted fabric to heat set the pigments.

    11. Your piece is now printed. Start making your art-quilt, using the top fabric and wadding. Embellish this with machine or hand stitch and beading to provide visual texture and interest. This also serves to hold your sandwich together. I used metallic polyester and cotton threads.

    12. Add backing fabric to your quilt sandwich, trim to size, and apply binding to the edges.

    13. Paint a label and apply this to your quilt using fusible webbing or stitch. Creating a unique
    label that reflects the individuality of your quilt title is fun, quick and easy to do.

    To download these instructions as a pdf file follow the link below:

    http://www.chromaonline.com/content/view/full/11579

  2. comment_2_11564

    Jim Cobb commented on October 5, 2010, at 3:05 pm.

    “Three Flow” Art-quilt for the wall
    by Pamela Priday

    A mono-printed fabric image in three colours with binding highlights. Quilting sandwich techniques with top sewn detail.

    Materials

    -A glass plate or perspex sheet as a printing plate, (tape edges of glass to prevent injury).
    -A plastic covered printing mat with lightly padded base
    -Selection of Jo Sonja acrylic paints in desired colours
    -Jo Sonja textile medium
    -Selection of cotton fabrics – black, white, for the border and the bindings.
    -Wadding
    -Sewing materials

    “Free Flow” is fun to create and easy to do.

    Method

    1. Wash the white piece of cotton fabric to remove sizing.
    2. The wadding does not need to be washed.
    3. Mix paint and fabric medium 50/50. Colours I used were red, yellow and blue, each
    being mixed with an equal amount of textile medium.
    4. Using a tiler’s tool, scrape through the paint on the plate to create a texture that you like.
    5. Lay fabric over the printing plate. Press using a brayer or your hands to engage a print. Lift off and let the fabric dry.
    6. Use a moderate heat setting and cover the painted cloth with a cloth. Iron to heat set the paint.
    7. Your piece is now printed adequately to make into a sandwich (top fabric and wadding).
    8. Quilt the black fabric/wadding to make a sandwich and provide additional textural interest.
    9. Cut your painted piece in three pieces.
    10. Attach the painted pieces to the black quilted sandwich by machining a small zigzag stitch around the edges of each of the three pieces using a thread that will not show. I like to use Superior’s MonoPoly thread.
    11. Couch pieces of yarn over the three pieces by hand or machine stitch.
    12. Add backing fabric, trim to size, and apply binding to edges.
    13. Paint a label and apply this to your quilt using fusible webbing or stitch. Creating a unique label that reflects the individuality of your quilt title is fun, quick and easy to do.

    Click this link to download the PDF instructions
    http://www.chromaonline.com/content/view/full/14474

  3. comment_3_11564

    Jim Cobb commented on October 5, 2010, at 3:55 pm.

    “Night land” Art-quilt for the wall
    by PAmela Priday

    Using three techniques; Screen-printing for the front of the quilt, Monoprinting (bubble wrap) on the back and painted fabric & wine cork stamping on label.

    Materials

    -Small silk screen and squeege
    -Printing mat (plastic covered lightly padded base)
    -Masking tape
    -Selection of Jo Sonja acrylic paints
    -Jo Sonja textile medium
    -Fabrics, wadding, and small piece of woollen yarn
    -Sewing materials

    Screen printing using Jo Sonja paints easily achieves an excellent result.

    Method

    1. 2 pieces of commercial fabric for the background (top of quilt) and backing. The tone and colour of the background fabric needs to be light enough for the screen-printed images to show clearly. Remove fabric sizing by washing prior to printing.

    2. The wadding to create your quilt sandwich does not need to be washed.

    3. Mask areas on the back of the silk screen with a paper design. On this piece I ripped pieces of masking tape and stuck them to the screen creating shapes that had rough textural edges.

    4. Tape fabric for the top of your art-quilt securely to your bench or table. Mix paint and textile medium 50/50. Pour a thick line of paint at the head of the squeege and pull through screen onto the fabric. Colours I used were black and dark blue. Leave to dry

    5. For the backing fabric, paint bubble wrap with a 50/50 mixture of paint & textile medium. Sponge brushes or rollers leave no brush marks but leave a bubbly surface. I mixed a mixture of yellows and oranges. Lay bubble wrap on plastic printing base then lay fabric over the bubble wrap and press using a brayer or your hands to engage a print. Lift off and leave to dry.

    6. Iron both painted fabrics by covering with a cloth. This heat sets the prints.
    .
    7. Machine stitch around the edges of each image using a tiny zigzag stitch to provide a crisp edge.

    8. Quilt the negative areas – I used metallic thread to provide additional colour.

    9. Machine stitch a circular shaped piece of woollen yarn – I used gold metallic thread – to provide a focal point.

    10. Your piece is now printed adequately to to sandwich top fabric and wadding together.

    11. Use an envelope sewing technique to finish this quilt and invisible stitch open end together.

    12. Paint a label and apply this to your quilt using fusible webbing or stitch. Creating a unique label that reflects the individuality of your quilt title is fun, quick and easy to do.